Before It Is Too Late

At any time

in my adult life

which came of age

during the civil rights movement,

it is clearly imperative

that we acknowledge

how far we have not come

in being

welcoming and loving

                                                                                   to all.

If we,

our children,

our children’s children,

are going to live together,

we must talk not

just with adults

about how this election cycle

has exposed rampant

prejudice and anger.

It is inherent

in sharing the

FACTS of LIFE.

Perhaps

the voices of our children

have more wisdom

and simplicity

in how

we can begin

in this moment

to love ourselves

and love each other.

Bouquet

Each

friend

represents

a world

in us,

a world

possibly

not born

until

he or she

arrives.

I have a bouquet

of friends,

each one

different.

I find

myself

revealing-

sometimes

discovering-

different

aspects

of myself

with each

of them.

livinglinesreflections.com

Our Best Selves

Pictures remind

Easter finery.

New bonnet,

Spring coat, perhaps

passed down

through

sisters and cousin.

New dress,

polished shoes

or new

patent leather!

Small flower corsage

from Daddy.

Some may still

dress this way

for Easter services,

I may admit to

a little envy.

We looked our best

or so it seemed.

The best outside dress-up

cannot cover up

the violence of

terror or the

insulting language

in the political campaign.

Steady reams of

news

proclaim

more crucifixion

than resurrection.

There are many

moments

of love and caring,

even random

acts of kindness.

What will it take

to dress up

ourselves,

our families and friends,

our neighborhoods

and our world

with sincere conversion

from the inside out.

Real love and kindness

generate

warmth and smiles.

How can we

dress

ourselves

with the

realization

that

we are all

in this world together?

Respect

for

each and every other,

dressed in finery

or clothes unfamiliar.

Garments given away

clothe

those without anything.

Respect

is the best

place

to begin.

We all

can dress ourselves best

caring for

each other.

Amen.

May The Road Rise to Meet You

May

the road rise

to meet you.

May the wind

be always

 at your back.

May the sun

shine

warm upon

your face,

the rains fall soft

upon your fields,

and when

we meet again,

May God

hold you

in the

palms of

His hand.

There are many versions

of this Irish Blessing.

There are many

who claim

Irish ancestors.

The Irish diaspora

spreads

far and wide.

Even our first

African American

President

has Irish roots

on his mother’s side.

As the 69th

Regiment

parades down

New York’s

Fifth Avenue,

I claim a

great-grandfather

who was a member of

the “Fighting Irish Brigade”.

I can do a bit of the jig,

dancing to the
Irish Washerwoman toe tapping music.

In 8th grade,

I soloed

the lilting
“Rose of Tralee”.

In cap and gown,

high heeled shoes,

 with my college freshmen class,

we marched in the

parade in the snow.

Memories linger

smiles especially broad

on this green day.

Do you have

a bit of Irish

on this day?

May the road rise to meet You.

Lost and Found

The word goes out,

the piles appear,

Lost and Found.

It is the end of the season

at a skating rink,

a ski lodge,

the swimming pool,

schools.

Some places keep

perpetual collections.

Looking at the

leavings,

it is amazing

how many

towels,

hats,

gloves,

books,

scarves-

things that you would expect

people,

often children,

would miss

have not been

claimed before.

Archeological

history

could be imagined

if the items

were found many years

later.

My favorites

are the individual

items I see

on my neighborhood walks.

Especially in winter

or now as the season is

tempting us

with warmer weather

to come.

A glove,

a hat,

always

just one.

Some stay

where lost.

Does anyone notice?

Some

do

and put onto a step, a branch

where the items may be more visible.

Yesterday,

I walked part way

to the place I was going

after being

given a ride halfway

to my destination.

Three hours later,

putting on my coat,

I felt for my gloves

expecting to also find

my favorite foldable hat.

Only gloves.

Oh well.

As I started walking home,

I came to the corner

where I had gotten out of the car.

Maybe the hat

fell as I was getting out of the car.

Eureka!

There

just at that corner

someone had

placed my hat

on a bush just at eye level

for my discovery.

It was a cold day,

I welcomed the warmth

of my lost and now found hat.

Best

Do the best

you can

with what

you have.

Enjoy the ride!

A 90 year old

shares the secret.

If we aren’t

satisfied

doing

our best

with

what

we have,

we won’t enjoy

what

we did

accomplish.

livinglinesreflections.com

Lock Down

Remembering

being

in New York City

on 9/11

where for more than 24 hours,

the bridges and tunnels

shut traffic going

in and out

of Manhattan Island.

Remembering

during

the week

of the

Boston Marathon

 being

“locked down”

at home

for 14 hours,

Hearing France’s borders

being closed

after the

horrific attacks

in Paris,

emotions

cascade.

Fear,

horror,

and

kindness.

Think

of

those who

didn’t run away

but went toward

the wounded

to help.

Flowers, candles

become altars

to express

sorrow

and

community.

We

know

even more clearly now,

we are all

in this together.

Locking down our feelings

doesn’t work

for us.

We are connected

in our humanity.

Near and far

reach out.

Social media

has its place.

We need physical

connection.

Reaching out

in the darkness

helps

to heal

wounds that

don’t go away.